Bit-Sized Motivation

Yesterday’s advice post seemed to be a hit, so let’s continue.

Some more bit-sized motivation. Complete with nice pictures and some added text. But 65 to look through!

http://brightdrops.com/best-inspirational-quotes

I had never read this one before: “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” ~Will Rogers


This was posted as a Zirtual Learningz post on April 8th, 2014

Advertisements

Learningz, February 10

The Olympics are in full-swing now and I hope the winter sports fans among us are rejoicing.

Here’s an interesting article on the approach to funding that the U.S. Olympic team has taken (and the “ecosystem” it has created).

What do you think Zeople? Has the US taken the right approach..

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Olympics/2014/0207/Why-USA-will-win-Sochi-Olympics-medal-count.-It-s-not-what-you-think.-video

This paragraph stood out to me:

But the fact that the USOC has to be accountable to the public (in this case through the media) has a deep effect on how the Olympics are viewed in America. Foreigners watching NBC’s coverage understandably complain about how it’s all profiles and weepy backstory. To the USOC, however, this is simply a matter of promoting its product to potential investors.

The Impenetrable Utterances of Warren G. Harding

“I would like the government to do all it can to mitigate, then, in understanding, in mutuality of interest, in concern for the common good, our tasks will be solved.”

That’s Warren G. Harding, and God knows what he meant. Harding’s utterances were so impenetrable that they developed a sort of fascinated following. “He writes the worst English that I have ever encountered,” wrote H.L. Mencken, who dubbed it Gamalielese. “It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it. It drags itself out of the dark abysm of pish, and crawls insanely up the topmost pinnacle of posh. It is rumble and bumble. It is flap and doodle. It is balder and dash.”

Senator_Warren_G._Harding

When Harding succumbed to a stroke in 1923, E.E. Cummings wrote, “The only man, woman, or child who wrote a simple declarative sentence with seven grammatical errors is dead.”